Hardware Experiments and Software Demonstrations

The following sessions will be held in the rear of the Exhibit Hall.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2017

10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Hands-On Verification of EMC Transients waveforms: CE, Automotive, MIL-STD-461
Jamison Berg and Gabe Alcala of Advanced Test Equipment Rentals, San Diego, CA, USA

 

In this hands-on demonstration we will go over the pre-testing verification of several different transients often seen in EMC testing. Often you will need to verify that your test equipment is outputting the correct waveform, thus it is important that you know how to set up then characterize the different types of waveforms. A few of the commercial tests we will be going over include: Lightning Surge, Electronic Fast Transient (EFT), Ring wave. We all also be showing everyone how to verify MIL-STD-461 CS115 & CS116 waveforms, as well as reviewing the automotive transients from ISO 7637.


10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Using Real-Time Spectral Analysis for Faster Troubleshooting of Radiated & Conducted Emissions and Co-Located Wireless Systems

Lee Hill, SILENT Solutions LLC & GmbH, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), Amherst, NH, USA

 

This presentation will use real-world noise sources including a switch-mode power supply, motor controller, brush DC motor, digital clock sources, and Bluetooth transceivers to demonstrate how real-time spectrum analysis can make previously invisible signals appear perfectly visible and quantifiable. This provides the EMC troubleshooter with exciting new insight for fast problem solving.


10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Incorporating Equipment Under Test (EUT) Monitoring within Immunity Testing

Jack McFadden, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

 

Automating the EMC test process has the benefits of improving measurement accuracy and repeatability while also increasing test throughput. The automated EMC test process is further enhanced by incorporating EUT monitoring using a vision system within the test program. Immunity testing with built-in EUT monitoring decreases error probability. This demonstration will show how a vision system can be incorporated into immunity testing and reduce potential errors.


10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

EMC Simulation for Early Stage Analysis and Troubleshooting of DC-DC Converter Conducted Emissions

Yushi Tan, CST of America, LLC, Framingham, MA, USA

 

In modern electronic applications a majority of devices utilize switched AC/DC or DC/DC converters in their power networks. The power provided from a source, is switched by the converter in order to adjust the output voltage level (Switch Mode Power Supply – SMPS). Unfortunately the switching always creates noise, which may be significant at higher frequencies. Furthermore, this unwanted emission can upset the source or any other device in the same supply power network, because it is easily transmitted through the power lines.

With coupled 3D EM field and circuit co-simulation, early stage analysis can be performed before a prototype of the device is manufactured. The subject of this demonstration is a typical bulk step-down DC/DC converter. We will show how to simulate the overall level of the conducted emissions and how EMI filtering can help suppress this. The effect of the PCB layout will also be shown and discussed. The simulation model and results will be compared directly to live measurement of the physical hardware sample.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Time Domain Site VSWR Measurements
Zhong Chen, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

 

This demonstration shows the time domain measurement process of obtaining the site VSWR as called out in CISPR for test site validation. A vector network analyzer is used to obtain the S21 response between two antennas. The data is transformed to time domain via inverse FFT. The reflections from the environment can be separated from the direct antenna responses due to time delays. After time gating and FFT, the reflection coefficient, consequently the VSWR of the test site (or chamber) – as a function of frequency can be derived. The demonstration shows the effectiveness of the measurement process, the data post-processing, and analysis of the results. Time domain site VSWR is post-processed through statistical techniques, and data is shown to correlate to the CISPR method. Note this demonstration provides an example of this measurement technique that is described in the new draft ANSI C63.25 standard for test site validation.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

5G Performance Measurements
Jari Vikstedt, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

 

This demonstration shows a simple 2-dimensional antenna pattern measurement for a 5G/millimeter wave (mmWave) antenna. The antenna under test (AUT) is fed with a modulated Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) signal that is created by a Vector Signal Generator (VSG). The transmitted signal is then measured with a dual polarized horn antenna and further analyzed with a Vector Signal Analyzer (VSA) while the AUT is rotated in the azimuth plane. The demonstration presents the challenges in millimeter wave communications and further emphasizes the tasks that lie ahead in order to perform accurate and confident measurements for 5G/mmWave antennas. Note this demonstration provides an example of this measurement technique in a 2-dimensional test system, but this approach may also be used to measure 3-dimensional antenna performance.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Impact of Cable Shield Terminations on Emissions Performance
Matt Juszczyk and Juan Valles, Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA, USA

 

Cable/Connector assemblies must be designed for cost effective manufacturing while being able to provide the required shielding to ensure control of emissions and susceptibility signals. Cable shield terminations that are less than a continuous 360-degree connection have the potential to notably degrade shielding effectiveness. Terminating cable shields using a wire (also known as a pigtail) will often render the shielding on a cable ineffective within certain EMI environments when the pigtail length becomes sufficiently long. In this demonstration, several cables will have their shield termination methods modified to demonstrate how wire gauge, length and termination method/location effect performance. Conclusions will be drawn in the context of transfer impedance across a broad frequency range.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Comprehensive Space Plasma EMC Analysis Using a Single Model
Bryon Neufeld, EMA, Denver, CO USA

 

Space plasmas present many risks to space vehicles, ranging from antenna pattern distortion to surface charging to box level transient coupling. The modern use of ceramics and other insulating materials in space vehicle platforms makes numerical EMC analysis an important part of the design process. The ability to perform a wide array of numerical analyses from a single geometric model provides great efficiency and flexibility for a space program. Different materials and other design variations can be incorporated into the model to obtain a comprehensive view of the impact of these modifications on overall vehicle EMC risk.

 

This demonstration will present a quantitative assessment of EMC risks due to space plasma environments. Emphasis will be on using a single geometric model to perform a wide array of assessments, including:

  • Surface Charging
  • Internal Charging (coupon)
  • Discharge Coupling to Cable
  • Thruster Plume-induced Antenna Pattern Distortion
  • Radiated Emissions/Radiated Susceptibility
TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2017
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

 

 

 

 

Time Domain Site VSWR Measurements
Zhong Chen, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

 

This demonstration shows the time domain measurement process of obtaining the site VSWR as called out in CISPR for test site validation. A vector network analyzer is used to obtain the S21 response between two antennas. The data is transformed to time domain via inverse FFT. The reflections from the environment can be separated from the direct antenna responses due to time delays. After time gating and FFT, the reflection coefficient, consequently the VSWR of the test site (or chamber) – as a function of frequency can be derived. The demonstration shows the effectiveness of the measurement process, the data post-processing, and analysis of the results. Time domain site VSWR is post-processed through statistical techniques, and data is shown to correlate to the CISPR method. Note this demonstration provides an example of this measurement technique that is described in the new draft ANSI C63.25 standard for test site validation.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

5G Performance Measurements
Jari Vikstedt, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, TX, USA

 

This demonstration shows a simple 2-dimensional antenna pattern measurement for a 5G/millimeter wave (mmWave) antenna. The antenna under test (AUT) is fed with a modulated Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) signal that is created by a Vector Signal Generator (VSG). The transmitted signal is then measured with a dual polarized horn antenna and further analyzed with a Vector Signal Analyzer (VSA) while the AUT is rotated in the azimuth plane. The demonstration presents the challenges in millimeter wave communications and further emphasizes the tasks that lie ahead in order to perform accurate and confident measurements for 5G/mmWave antennas. Note this demonstration provides an example of this measurement technique in a 2-dimensional test system, but this approach may also be used to measure 3-dimensional antenna performance.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

Impact of Cable Shield Terminations on Emissions Performance
Matt Juszczyk and Juan Valles, Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, IA, USA

 

Cable/Connector assemblies must be designed for cost effective manufacturing while being able to provide the required shielding to ensure control of emissions and susceptibility signals. Cable shield terminations that are less than a continuous 360-degree connection have the potential to notably degrade shielding effectiveness. Terminating cable shields using a wire (also known as a pigtail) will often render the shielding on a cable ineffective within certain EMI environments when the pigtail length becomes sufficiently long. In this demonstration, several cables will have their shield termination methods modified to demonstrate how wire gauge, length and termination method/location effect performance. Conclusions will be drawn in the context of transfer impedance across a broad frequency range.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

Comprehensive Space Plasma EMC Analysis Using a Single Model
Bryon Neufeld, EMA, Denver, CO USA

 

Space plasmas present many risks to space vehicles, ranging from antenna pattern distortion to surface charging to box level transient coupling. The modern use of ceramics and other insulating materials in space vehicle platforms makes numerical EMC analysis an important part of the design process. The ability to perform a wide array of numerical analyses from a single geometric model provides great efficiency and flexibility for a space program. Different materials and other design variations can be incorporated into the model to obtain a comprehensive view of the impact of these modifications on overall vehicle EMC risk.

 

This demonstration will present a quantitative assessment of EMC risks due to space plasma environments. Emphasis will be on using a single geometric model to perform a wide array of assessments, including:

  • Surface Charging
  • Internal Charging (coupon)
  • Discharge Coupling to Cable
  • Thruster Plume-induced Antenna Pattern Distortion
  • Radiated Emissions/Radiated Susceptibility
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 2017

9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Transmission Line Reflections at a Load and at a Discontinuity
Dr. Bogdan Adamczyk, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI, USA

 

This demonstration addresses the phenomenon of reflections on transmission lines. First, the concept of the voltage and current waves travelling along a transmission line is presented, together with a simple transmission line model. Then the effect of the resistive terminations on the signal integrity is discussed. Subsequently, the effect of the discontinuity along the line is shown. Real-time measurements are performed to support the analytical models developed.


9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Conducted Transients on Spacecraft Primary Power Lines
John McCloskey and Jen Dimov, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA

 

One of the sources of potential interference on spacecraft primary power lines is that of conducted transients resulting from equipment being switched on and off of the bus. Susceptibility to such transients is addressed by some version of the CS06 requirement of MIL-STD-461/462. This demonstration provides a basis for understanding of the sources of these transients, analysis techniques for determining their worst-case characteristics (e.g. magnitude and duration), and guidelines for minimizing their magnitudes and applying the requirement appropriately.


9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Improving Pulsed/Intermittent Signal Measurements Utilizing Time Domain Scan and Real-Time Spectrum Analysis
Bill Wangard, Rohde & Schwarz, Kildeer, IL, USA

 

The growing complexity of electronics within both military and commercial products is resulting in the emissions of more pulsed/intermittent signals which must be properly characterized during EMC testing. Unfortunately pulsed and/or intermittent signals are difficult to detect and even more difficult to properly characterize for electromagnetic interference. It is well known that Time Domain Scan offers a significant speed advantage over traditional swept spectrum analyzers, however it is not as well known that Time Domain Scan also offers a significant improvement in the ability to capture and characterizer pulse and intermittent signals. Real-time spectrum analysis also provides invaluable insight to analyzing pulsed signals in order to determine the proper dwell times of EMC measurements.

 

This hardware demonstration will utilize a USB comb generator with a pulsed spectrum to compare the differences in the ability of a swept spectrum analyzer and receiver utilizing time domain scan to characterize pulsed emissions. Real-time spectrum analysis will also be used to characterize the time varying spectrum and resultant analysis used to properly configure the receiver parameters for EMC emissions measurements.


9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Hybrid PEEC/MTL Solution for Analysis of Transmission-line Effects on PCB
Irina Oganezova, EMCoS Ltd., Tbilisi, Georgia

 

This demonstration material describes a hybrid approach for investigation of performance of printed circuit board (PCB) by examining the impact of parasitic parameters of the board design on the efficiency of a device. Firstly, parasitic parameters are extracted from board layout by 3D quasistatic field solvers. Secondly, the corresponding equivalent circuit is constructed. Thirdly, the extracted parasitic circuits are incorporated into functional circuit model. Finally, Modified Nodal Analysis (MNA) is used to examine complete network. The hybridization makes it possible to vary circuit parameters and layout independently to achieve maximum system performance. Validation of the proposed method is performed by comparison of simulation results with measurements of GSM band signal amplifier.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Frequency Spectra of Transients
John McCloskey and Jen Dimov, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA

 

Radiated emissions measurements as specified by MIL-STD- 461 are performed in the frequency domain, which is best suited to continuous wave (CW) types of signals. However, many platforms implement signals that are single event pulses or transients. Such signals can potentially generate momentary radiated emissions that can cause interference in the system, but they may be missed with traditional measurement techniques. This demonstration provides measurement and analysis techniques that effectively evaluate the potential emissions from such signals in order to evaluate their potential impacts to system performance.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Measuring Shielding Effectiveness at the IC Level
Stephan Pfennig, Langer EMV-Technik GmbH, Bannewitz, Germany

 

Langer EMV-Technik has developed a new method allowing for the separate measurement of both the electric and magnetic field when measuring immunity and shielding effectiveness at the IC level. The approach uses the Langer ground plane GND25, a spacer, and the field sources P1401 and P1501. The test board with the mounted IC is placed into the dedicated opening of the ground plane with the IC facing upwards. The electric-field source P1401 or magnetic-field source P1501 is then placed above the IC using a ring-shaped spacer, which defines the height of the source above the IC. The P1401 generates a dominant electric field and the P1501 generates a dominant magnetic field. This allows the IC immunity to electric and magnetic fields to be measured separately. This advantage was then used to investigate the shielding effectiveness of various shielding configurations applied to integrated circuits.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Distinguishing Common Mode from Differential Mode Conducted Emissions
Jerry Meyerhoff, JDM Labs LLC, Buffalo Grove, IL, USA

 

The method can separate differential mode (DM) and common mode (CM) effects, in both time & frequency domain. Power supply samples with improved CM and DM filtering will be compared. DIY and very low cost instruments are used for Pre-compliance, but with care they do correlate well with formal laboratory methods.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Modeling and Simulation of Cable Harness Radiation and Susceptibility for Automotive and Aircraft Structures
Dr. Marius H. Vogel, Altair Engineering, Inc., Hampton, VA, USA

 

In EMC/EMI applications, electrical cables and cable bundles are often the main source of concern. Due to their lengths, they can be effective radiators or receivers of radiation. This simulation demonstration will teach how to model and simulate relevant scenarios, and will provide a refresher on transforming frequency-domain data to the time domain and vice versa. A few scenarios will be discussed, e.g. lightning, high-frequency radiated fields, and automotive EMC. In the latter case, a recipe will be provided to determine the differential-to- common-mode conversion that takes place on the PCB, and, for a digital signal, to determine the resulting radiation from a twisted-wire pair and compare it with government regulations. In addition, we will discuss PCB modeling with the Partial Element Equivalent Circuit method for EMC and Signal Integrity applications.

In addition, simulation techniques for shielding enclosures with gaskets will be discussed. Due to aspect ratios of gaskets, such simulations can be challenging.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 2017
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

 

 

 

 

Frequency Spectra of Transients
John McCloskey and Jen Roberts, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA

 

Radiated emissions measurements as specified by MIL-STD- 461 are performed in the frequency domain, which is best suited to continuous wave (CW) types of signals. However, many platforms implement signals that are single event pulses or transients. Such signals can potentially generate momentary radiated emissions that can cause interference in the system, but they may be missed with traditional measurement techniques. This demonstration provides measurement and analysis techniques that effectively evaluate the potential emissions from such signals in order to evaluate their potential impacts to system performance.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

Measuring Shielding Effectiveness at the IC Level
Stephan Pfennig, Langer EMV-Technik GmbH, Bannewitz, Germany

 

Langer EMV-Technik has developed a new method allowing for the separate measurement of both the electric and magnetic field when measuring immunity and shielding effectiveness at the IC level. The approach uses the Langer ground plane GND25, a spacer, and the field sources P1401 and P1501. The test board with the mounted IC is placed into the dedicated opening of the ground plane with the IC facing upwards. The electric-field source P1401 or magnetic-field source P1501 is then placed above the IC using a ring-shaped spacer, which defines the height of the source above the IC. The P1401 generates a dominant electric field and the P1501 generates a dominant magnetic field. This allows the IC immunity to electric and magnetic fields to be measured separately. This advantage was then used to investigate the shielding effectiveness of various shielding configurations applied to integrated circuits.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

Distinguishing Common Mode from Differential Mode Conducted Emissions
Jerry Meyerhoff, JDM Labs LLC, Buffalo Grove, IL, USA

 

The method can separate differential mode (DM) and common mode (CM) effects, in both time & frequency domain. Power supply samples with improved CM and DM filtering will be compared. DIY and very low cost instruments are used for Pre-compliance, but with care they do correlate well with formal laboratory methods.


2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Rear of Exhibit Hall

Modeling and Simulation of Cable Harness Radiation and Susceptibility for Automotive and Aircraft Structures
Dr. Marius H. Vogel, Altair Engineering, Inc., Hampton, VA, USA

 

In EMC/EMI applications, electrical cables and cable bundles are often the main source of concern. Due to their lengths, they can be effective radiators or receivers of radiation. This simulation demonstration will teach how to model and simulate relevant scenarios, and will provide a refresher on transforming frequency-domain data to the time domain and vice versa. A few scenarios will be discussed, e.g. lightning, high-frequency radiated fields, and automotive EMC. In the latter case, a recipe will be provided to determine the differential-to- common-mode conversion that takes place on the PCB, and, for a digital signal, to determine the resulting radiation from a twisted-wire pair and compare it with government regulations. In addition, we will discuss PCB modeling with the Partial Element Equivalent Circuit method for EMC and Signal Integrity applications.

 

In addition, simulation techniques for shielding enclosures with gaskets will be discussed. Due to aspect ratios of gaskets, such simulations can be challenging.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2017

9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

ESD Measurement Techniques with Oscilloscopes
Mike Hertz, Teledyne LeCroy, MI, US

 

Example topics included in my presentation include:

  • ESD Pulse Test Requirements and Measurement Thresholds
  • Sequenced Acquisition for EFT (Electrical Fast Transient) Debug
  • Surge Testing
  • Voltage Testing Below Battery Level
  • Sample Rate and V/div Effect on ESD Pulse Measurements
  • Level-At-Pulse, Time-To-Value, and Parameter Limiters
  • ESD RC Time Constant Measurement
  • Radiated Immunity Testing

9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Control of Electric and Magnetic Radiated Emissions at Low and High Frequencies
Pablo Narvaez and Charles Rhoads, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA

 

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has participated in multiple projects whereby implementation of proper electric and magnetic field shielding has been a key component in successful space missions free of electromagnetic interference. This hardware experiment/demonstration presents typical radiated electric and magnetic field shielding methods similar to those applied on JPL hardware for typical flight programs.


9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

A Simulation Workflow for Interference-Free Design of Electronic Devices
Dr. Fred German, ANSYS, Inc., Champaign, IL, USA

 

In our modern wireless world, we are seeing ever increasing complexity in modern commercial electronics. It is commonplace for devices to include multiple RF transceivers, digital data sources and sensors co-located in a very small space with the expectation of continuous and uninterrupted simultaneous operation. This “co-existence” in a confined environment, rich with digital signals that themselves produce RF emissions that can “desense” receivers on the device, introduces an urgent need to consider RFI issues as early in the product design process as possible.

This demonstration will show an integrated engineering design workflow for addressing radio frequency interference (RFI) throughout the design process of wireless devices. The workflow leverages processes and tools commonly in use by design engineers to enable the identification and mitigation of RF coexistence and desense issues as early in the design flow as possible. We will show that by using existing tools and techniques, designing with RFI in mind can be accomplished without introducing significant additional overhead to the design process. An interactive software demonstration will show the application of the workflow to a real device.

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